Sunday, July 3, 2011

Peter Nadin


Cured hams made on Nadin's farm; Nadin pouring wax on a sculpture; beehive housing that Nadin built.The still lifes morphed into a series in which Nadin began to paint giant bananas looming outside a house in a landscape, in a gauzy, impastoed style that recalled late Monet.
Christopher D’Arcangelo, Peter Nadin, Daniel Buren, WallStreet, around 1978.“If you eat ham from one of my pigs or honey from my bees, then you’re ingesting the landscape here itself — it’s not an objectification of it,” he explained, in one of many such formulations that I heard over a couple of months of visits to the farm. “It’s the thing itself. And what I’m trying to do with the paintings and with everything I have been making here is not to represent the landscape but to make things that embody it, to paint the underlying experience of consciousness.” He compares the pieces to relics in a world that might not be as post-religious as our rational minds would have us believe.
Robin Winters, Richard Prince, Jenny Holzer, Coleen Fitzgibbon, Peter Fend, Peter Nadin, around 1980, Los Angeles.Instead of making art objects, this short-lived, late-'70s collective was founded to perform socially helpful work for hire. “I think we were supposed to hand out aesthetic advice, but I was never sure,” Prince told me by e-mail, adding: “I thought we were supposed to play music. But we never played.” Prince later organized an exhibition of Nadin’s paintings at his Spiritual America gallery, the semilegendary storefront that he ran briefly on Rivington Street, where he also showed the work of Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons and Louise Lawler. Prince said that he was drawn to Nadin back then both because he was a poet and because of a certain evanescent quality about him: “He had that . . . ‘I’m not a real doctor, but I play one on TV.’ I liked that about him.”
- Randy Kennedy The NY Times